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Copenhagen Accord – missing the mark

Cross posted from Nature’s Climate Feedback blog…

Current pledges to reduce emissions are nowhere near good enough to keep the planet’s warming to below 2°C, argue Joeri Rogelj, Malte Meinshausen and colleagues in an opinion piece in Nature this week.

They analyzed the pledges made in conjunction with the Copenhagen Accord, taking into account a few major loopholes that will likely make emissions worse. First, they say, most nations will only meet the higher ends of their emissions reductions targets if there is a better international agreement in place, so the lower ends of their targets are more realistic.

Secondly, many nations have banked surplus emissions allowances from 2008-2012 that they are likely to use after 2012. Thirdly, some nations will probably be permitted extra allowances thanks to land use change, such as planting forests, that go beyond actual emissions savings. All of this paints a poor picture of future emissions.

Read the full post by Nicola Jones on Climate Feedback.

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    Harryhammer said:

    There are plenty of groups opposing action by the U.S. government to curb greenhouse gas emissions. The problem is that most of them have little or nothing to do with science. The core of the denial movement are conservative think tanks like the Competitive Enterprise Institute. If not for their herculean effort to derail science, we could very well be on our way to solving a major crisis in which time is a critical factor.

    What’s happening now is nothing new.

    In the 1980′s, scientists were concerned about the ozone layer when most of the world didn’t have the slightest clue about what ozone was. Scientists were saying that a compound best known by the DuPont brand name “Freon” was harming the planet. They said that certain chemicals were destroying part of the atmosphere that is essential for human life because it blocks out harmful ultraviolet radiation that causes cancer.

    Read: Opinions that Matter

    http://harryhammer.wordpress.com/2010/03/16/opinions-that-matter/

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