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Update on Scientific Reports Fast Track Experiment

On Tuesday 24th March we introduced a small-scale, one month experiment on fast track peer review (up to 40 manuscripts maximum), which would enable authors to receive a first decision within three weeks of passing our quality control checks. You can read our original post on this here.  Read more

Further experiments in peer review

There is a post on the Scholarly Kitchen blog this week that asks: “how can we improve the article review and submission process?” For all of us involved in scientific and scholarly publishing, it has long been accepted that peer review is necessary and beneficial in ensuring the quality of scientific communication. But it is also seen by many as an imperfect system: less efficient than it should be and sometimes frustratingly slow.  Read more

Content sharing is *not* open access and why NPG is committed to both

It’s not an exaggeration to say that we’ve been overwhelmed this week with the response to our announcement that we are enabling sharing of subscription content on nature.com. We anticipated people would be interested, and hoped some of our readers and library customers would welcome it.  We want to help researchers share papers they are reading, and our goal was to make that easier.  Read more

Book 6: The Cancer Chronicles: Unlocking Medicine’s Deepest Mystery by George Johnson (2014 Royal Society Winton Prize for Science Books)

Book 6: The Cancer Chronicles: Unlocking Medicine's Deepest Mystery by George Johnson (2014 Royal Society Winton Prize for Science Books)

Cancer is a disease that inspires dread in many people. Most of us have had some experience of it or, at the very least, have read one of the myriad articles in the press about the latest cause or cure. George Johnson’s The Cancer Chronicles cuts through all of the noise and confusion, and presents a fascinating, often frightening, but ultimately empowering, account of the history of cancer and the human quest to understand it.  Read more

Book 5: Seven Elements that have Changed the World by John Browne (2014 Royal Society Winton Prize for Science Books)

Book 5: Seven Elements that have Changed the World by John Browne (2014 Royal Society Winton Prize for Science Books)

There are works of non-fiction that focus solely on the subject matter and then there are works of non-fiction that are just as much about the author’s views as about the topic at hand.  Seven Elements that have Changed the World falls squarely in the latter category.  Read more

Book 4: The Perfect Theory: A Century of Geniuses and the Battle over General Relativity by Pedro G. Ferreira (2014 Royal Society Winton Prize for Science Books)]

Book 4: The Perfect Theory: A Century of Geniuses and the Battle over General Relativity by Pedro G. Ferreira (2014 Royal Society Winton Prize for Science Books)]

Albert Einstein’s general theory of relativity, published nearly 100 years ago, explains the relationship between gravity, space and time. The theory provides “the key to understanding the history of the universe, origin of time, and the evolution of all the stars and galaxies in the cosmos,” according to Pedro G. Ferreira. His book, The Perfect Theory, tells the tale of how the theory was questioned, tested, modified and supported by a range of scientists. It is a book with gravity that pulls you in, describing what the theory has taught us so far, and what we may learn from it in the future.  Read more