Archive by category | Scientific publishing

The harder they fall

The harder they fall

Pretty busy week over at the JAMA offices. First came the report that one of its editors had called a whistleblower a “”http://blogs.wsj.com/health/2009/03/13/jama-editor-calls-critic-a-nobody-and-a-nothing/“>nobody and a nothing”, report that was accompanied by a pretty long series of comments from outraged readers.  Read more

Mine is larger than yours

Mine is larger than yours

A dear friend of mine sent me a link to this page, which shows the “h indices” of what the author of the page refers to the “best Spanish scientists”. The page is a bit difficult to navigate if you don’t know Spanish, but it doesn’t matter; I’m sure that if you have the time and inclination, you will find a similar page in your language and for the nationality of your choice.  Read more

Barking at the wrong tree

Barking at the wrong tree

Time to return to the issue I brought up the other day regarding the open-access debate. Some people think that publishing firms rip people off by taking scientific information from the community and selling it back to the very providers of this information. This ignores, of course, that some journals such as the Nature titles, Science and the Cell Press stable add value to the content they publish by filtering scientific information in such a way that their imprimatur is (in most cases) guarantee of quality. Ironically, as these journals have professional editors, who are the public face of the titles, they tend to receive most of the negative feedback regarding our business model.  Read more

No such thing as a free lunch

No such thing as a free lunch

As I was saying yesterday, several people have made comments on the talk I gave in Madrid last month, as well as on the related blog post. Considering that we don’t really censor people who write to us and that we are very receptive of feedback, I find it amusing that few of these comments have been posted on our blog, and that people prefer to cut and paste from what I wrote on their own blogs, but so be it.  Read more

15 seconds of fame

You may or may not have noticed that I haven’t been blogging for over a week; I was in Madrid giving a talk in which I tried to make the point that we don’t discriminate against authors on the basis of nationality, language or any other non-scientific aspect. In a previous entry, I had already shared some data to back this statement up, and I used the same and additional data during the talk to drive the point home. It was quite amusing to see that some people still didn’t believe me: “sure, I can see that your graphs show that you don’t discriminate, but I still don’t believe you”. What is there left to say?  Read more

More on discrimination

More on discrimination

One of my colleagues was telling me the other day that we at the journal have a bias in favor of the USA. She was specifically making this comment with regard to our reviewer pool, which is indeed dominated by US-based scientists. But then again, there are many more scientists here than in any other country in the world.  Read more