Science Events in London: 2 – 8 April

Easter Holidays have begun here and with that comes a much quieter period of events, with most of the university events on hiatus for the next fortnight. On the upside, many of the museums are running special holiday activities for children with the Natural History Museum leading the way with a series of activities themed around chocolate eggs.

Monday

UCL hosts Brian Collins, new new Director of the UCL Centre for Engineering Policy and former Chief Scientific Adviser for several government departments as he gives a talk entitled “Sustainably modernising national infrastructure – an opportunity for engineering policy”. 6:30pm; free but book your place in advance.

Tuesday

Back to UCL for an even more topical one tonight: “Is the Green Deal a red herring?”. Tonight’s debate will look at the deal, scheduled to come into action in Autumn this year, and ask what it is really hoping to achieve. 5:30 – 7pm; free.

Wednesday

Tonight’s choice is a little far out, in Teddington, but looks as promising as all the IET events do: Ultra Personal Rapid Transit at Heathrow and Beyond. In 2011 Heathrow Airport unveiled the Heathrow pod, the airport’s most innovative transport system and the first new example of transit technology in 100 years. Tonight’s talk will look at how the system is working out. 7:30pm at the Adelaide Pub in Teddington, TW11 0AU.

Thursday

The Wellcome Collection continues its look at the personal side of medicine tonight with 22 year old Harriet and her GP looking back at her fight with epilepsy and cancer. One of a series of discussions with patients and their doctors on finding the best treatments: free but book in advance, the last one was sold out. 7pm.

The Weekend

Hampstead Observatory is still running its winter schedule of observing, open Friday and Saturday night 8-10pm for star gazing and Sunday 11-1pm for sun gazing. Free and no need to book, but all weather dependent, so check first.

You can follow the Nature Network London Google calendar of events in London at http://blogs.nature.com/london/2011/05/17/scientific-events-calendar. Updated daily.

————————————————————————–

As well as our regularly maintained calendar, you can find lots of other suggestions of science-y events in London. We have compiled a list of some other places to look: we will continue adding to this list, and please do, as always, send us additions for it:

Collections and calendars

Londonist recommendations: All things scientific, technical and geeky

Ian Visits: A calendar of all types of events in London, including science and engineering, with added editorial

Museums, societies etc:

Wellcome Collection: Regular events and exhibitions of a medical flavour at the Wellcome Collection on Euston Road

Royal Institution: Miscellaneous science and policy events

Royal Society: Science, policy and conferences

ZSL: Zoological Society of London; occasional events on conservation and zoology

Hunterian Museum: Part of the Royal College of Surgeons, with a treasure trove of specimens and surgical paraphenalia

University calendars (usually featuring dozens of events per week)

UCL

Imperial

LSE

 

Science Funding: Funding Cancer Research UK

Over the years science funding has changed significantly. In the past, funding would have been obtained through private benefaction or from wealthy individuals. Today, researchers are usually funded by a mixture of grants from government agencies, non-profit foundations and institutions. However, with the increasing popularity of social media and the internet, methods used to obtain money may be undergoing a shift. New routes linking funding sources with scientists are being increasingly explored. Tighter budgets and struggling economies are driving a need for new ways of funding and social media is proving to be invaluable in raising awareness of projects and linking like-minded people more effectively.

In a special Soapbox Science series, nature.com blogs has been focusing on the new ways in which science groups and individuals are obtaining funding and how projects such as Petridish, Tekla LabsKickstarter and the #scifundchallenge may change the future of scientific research. Crowd funding of research has been happening all over the world and Nature London is turning the spotlight on Cancer Research UK, the UK based cancer charity who have looked to the public to fund specific research projects. MyProjects is a web-based initiative to give members of the public the opportunity to donate to a specific piece of research which is meaningful to them. The projects are described online, with a target of how much money needs to be raised in donations before they will be collected and work will begin. At the moment, 39 projects are seeking or have reached full funding, spanning a whole range of cancers. One of the major beneficiaries of this initiative was Professor Jack Cuzick , head of the Centre for Epidemiology, Mathematics and Statistics at the Wolfson Institute in London, whose major trial of a breast cancer drug raised over £100,000 of funding. Nature London met with him.

Professor Cuzick, welcome to Nature London. Firstly, tell us a bit about your work. You’re co-ordinating the International Breast Cancer Intervention Study II.

Yes. IBIS-II is a double blind randomised trial with 2 strata:

i. In high risk women (mostly due to family history) without breast cancer we compare anastrozole to placebo for 5 years.

ii. In women with locally excised oestrogen receptor positive Ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) with clear margins we are comparing anastrozole to tamoxifen.

We have just completed recruitment and achieved our project numbers. Compliance has been good and the study is progressing well

What do you hope to achieve from this work?

The main endpoints are for breast cancer prevention in the high risk groups – we are hoping for a 70% reduction. In the DCIS stratum we hope that anastrozole will be 25% more effective than tamoxifen.  It is projected that we will have an adequate number of events to evaluate this in 12-18 months.

You raised a considerable sum of money for this work from MyProjects, the public donations project run by Cancer Research UK – over £100,000. How did you get involved in that?

We spoke with potential donors on a few occasions and did an interview.

Ed’s note: you can see Professor Cuzick talking on film about his goals here:

With public funding and charitable donations under pressure in the current climate, do you think that the public directly supporting individual research projects could be a serious source of funding for scientific research in the future?

Yes, especially for this type of research that has a direct and easily understood message for the public, direct appeals are a good potential source of support. I don’t have a strong view, but it makes sense to fund more work this way in future. And for the public, having an identified project for which support is provided, is a nice way to help support cancer research as the money can be more directly linked to an advancement.

Did the fact that you raised so much money from members of the public specifically for this project have any affect on your work as a scientist?

Only to get a strong feeling that the public supports our work, which is nice.

Professor’s Cuzick’s work is now closed to donations, but Cancer Research UK is still running a series of projects which you can support directly. To see all the available projects, go to http://myprojects.cancerresearchuk.org/projects

Science Events in London 26 March – 1st April

Monday

Cafe Scientifique is back at the Royal Society with Seeing Double, looking at human figures in computer graphics and asking why the brain struggles to accept them as real. 6:30-8pm at the Royal Society, free and no need to book, but places are first come, first served.

Tuesday

Digital Science host Inventing the Future,  a free event looking at what it takes to combine scientific, technological and commercial innovation, the three vital ingredients for building new worlds and the key behind innovation hubs such as Silicon Valley and Boston. 6:30-10pm at the Royal Institution: currently sold out, but worth watching for any returns.

Wednesday

Science London, the event for science fans of a crafty disposition is doing printing tonight, with patterns found in nature, from pineapples to crystals. £2 for a bag to print on, or you can bring your own. 7pm start; get there early to reserve a table.

Meanwhile at the Royal Institution, Alok Jha and guests will be recording Science Weekly, the Guardian’s science podcast, live in front of an audience. Audience participation promised. Free, 7pm start.

Thursday

With the sunny weather, it couldn’t be more perfect timing for the events programme at Kew Gardens to restart and tonight’s event is entitled Cosmic Oasis, a look at the cosmic events which have left our little blue planet as the only known place in the universe with life. 7pm at Kew; £5 entry.

Friday

The lunchtime lecture at the Royal Society today asks whether modern plastics have lived up to the grand dreams of early pioneers like Leo Baekeland. 1pm, free, all welcome.

The Weekend

The Kirkaldy Testing Museum, which bizarrely doesn’t have its own website, has an open day on the first Sunday of the month (this Sunday) to see its varied collection of machines.

Hampstead Observatory is still running its winter schedule of observing, open Friday and Saturday night 8-10pm for star gazing and Sunday 11-1pm for sun gazing. Free and no need to book, but all weather dependent, so check first.

You can follow the Nature Network London Google calendar of events in London at http://blogs.nature.com/london/2011/05/17/scientific-events-calendar. Updated daily.

————————————————————————–

As well as our regularly maintained calendar, you can find lots of other suggestions of science-y events in London. We have compiled a list of some other places to look: we will continue adding to this list, and please do, as always, send us additions for it:

Collections and calendars

Londonist recommendations: All things scientific, technical and geeky

Ian Visits: A calendar of all types of events in London, including science and engineering, with added editorial

Museums, societies etc:

Wellcome Collection: Regular events and exhibitions of a medical flavour at the Wellcome Collection on Euston Road

Royal Institution: Miscellaneous science and policy events

Royal Society: Science, policy and conferences

ZSL: Zoological Society of London; occasional events on conservation and zoology

Hunterian Museum: Part of the Royal College of Surgeons, with a treasure trove of specimens and surgical paraphenalia

University calendars (usually featuring dozens of events per week):

UCL

Imperial

LSE

 

FameLab UK: The Winner!

FameLab, the national competition to find the next big thing in science communication reached its finale on Wednesday night in a glitzy event at the Royal Institution.

A quick recap for new readers: the competition began last autumn with regional heats to find the best new science communicators in the country. Over 100 people have taken three minutes to wow a panel of judges with their science, with topics so wide ranging it is impossible to even suggest two to show the diversity. No corner of science has been left unturned, and last night as 10 finalists from all over the country came together to compete one last time, the winner finally triumphed with that age-old gold standard of science: quantum mechanics.

Credit: Andy Paradise

FameLabUK winner Dr Andrew Steele with judges Professor Russell Foster and Professor Alice Roberts

Dr Andrew Steele, from the University of Oxford’s Department of Condensed Matter Physics, took the crown with a presentation on how quantum mechanics can help us to understand the world around us, with an emphasis on why carrots are orange. Andrew has already had some success with science communication of a different type, having been highly commended in Greenwich Observatory’s Astronomy Photographer of the Year competition last year, and said after his triumph last night “To have won an award here [at the Royal Institution] is just incredible. I really hope people have come away from tonight’s event feeling as inspired by science as I am”. Andrew wins £1000 for himself and £750 for science communication projects and will compete in the International Final at the Cheltenham Science Festival in June.

 

Credit: Andy Paradise

 

 

Credit: Andy Paradise

 

 

 

Runners up Jamie Gallagher and Lucy Thorne at the Royal Institution

Congratulations also to joint runners up Lucy Thorne of Imperial College London with a presentation on the use of viruses in the treatment of disease and Jamie Gallagher of the University of Glasgow for his suggestion of powering cars of the future to save the planet. Nature London met Lucy in December following her win in the London heats and you can read the full interview here, along with our full archive of FameLab content.

FameLab will be at the Cheltenham Science Festival for the International Final in June, then will return for the 2013 national heats in the autumn. If you’ve been inspired to have a go, all the details for entering are at www.famelab.org.

Scientists and journalists need different things from science: the follow-up

Last week’s Royal Institution debate on science reporting in the media has stirred up a whole range of discussions online, from the role of science media centres to the hottest question of the night: whether science journalists should be reading the primary literature behind their story. The discussion raged on Twitter during the debate and afterwards, with one side arguing that no journalist could ever understand all the papers they need to cover, even in a narrow field of reporting, with the other claiming that it is a basic part of the job, and to fail is, in the words of Ed Yong, malpractice.

To add to the conversation, several of the nature.com bloggers  have written their own responses to the debate, beginning with Matt Shipman, the Public Information Officer at North Carolina State University who has been writing a series of related posts over the last week on the Soapbox Science blog. In his response to the debate, Matt takes on the debate over journalists reading papers with his view:

I agree that it would be great if reporters read all the papers they wrote about. However, I also think it is both wildly optimistic and very unrealistic to expect most journalists to do so. After all, the odds are excellent that the journalist would not be able to understand what they’re reading anyway.

What follows is not an excuse for shoddy reporting, but a view on how reading the paper isn’t the only – or even the best – way to understand and report on the research. Well worth a read, and keep going to the end for an anecdote on how the lay science reporter can even sometimes go one better than the scientific experts.

Meanwhile, Tim Skellett, an Australian blogger asks whether blogs are really important for the mainstream press:

Can your blog or your networking change the world for the better? Will the media take notice of you unasked? The answer to both questions is a definite yes.

With a series of examples of times when blogs have had a huge impact on traditional reporting, including the famous British case of Night Jack, the blogging policeman outed by The Times, Tim argues that not only can blogs make a difference, but they do and it is up to everyone to use that power to try to help improve the standard of science in the media.

Last but not least, new Nature Network blogger Peter Etchells, who was at the debate, gave his view as a scientist on the issues raised on the night, saying amongst other things:

I was particularly disappointed to find from the poll that Cardiff Uni conducted that very few scientists thought it was their fault when their work got misrepresented in the media. That really has to change – if you’re not explaining your work properly, either directly to the media or via a press office, then it’s not fair to get uppity about it when it’s printed. Let’s clean up our own backyard before we start treading on someone else’s.

As well as on the blogs, there is plenty of discussion going on on Google Plus: see a sample of comments below and do join in the debate.

You can watch the recording of the event in the video below.  The debate continues on Twitter under the hashtag #riscimedia and on Google Plus where you can discuss this, or any other stories from nature.com. Do let us know your thoughts!

Alok Jha: Science and the Media – Presentations from The Royal Institution on Vimeo.

Science Events in London: 19 – 25 March

Monday

Imperial’s Energy Futures Lab hosts its Annual Lecture 2012 tonight, entitled ‘More sustainable power generation technologies’. Charles Soothill, Chief Technology Officer for ALSTOM Power will take a look at the implications and future of the development of new technologies at ALSTOM. 6-7pm in the Mechanical Engineering department; free but book in advance.

On a lighter note, it is that time of the month again: the Royal Institution quiz, hosted by Londonist’s Matt Brown. 7pm start; £2 entry; no need to book.

Tuesday

Join me for a debate entitled “Science and design: parallel processes?” at the Central Saint Martins College of Art & Design which will host panelists including Professor Geraint Rees, group leader of Wellcome Trust Centre for Neuroimaging and Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience and Leonora Oppenheim, a design storyteller whose main focus is Creative Data, an initiative that communicates data and research to the public through a series of interactive design exhibitions and creative learning projects. 7pm; free but registration essential.

Wednesday

The highlight of the week for science communicators at the Royal Institution tonight: the Grand Final of FameLabUK! FameLab is the international competition for science communication and this is the culmination of regional heats held earlier in the year. You can see Nature London’s coverage of the London heats to get a feel for it and attend the final in person to see London winner Lucy Thorne take on the final competition. 7pm at the RI: £10 and advised to book in advance. Dress code: glam up!

Thursday

A personal medical journey at the Wellcome Collection tonight: patient Edward and physiotherapist Jenny tell the story of his long, painful recovery from acute pancreatitis and the stages of care that brought him back to life. 7-8pm; free but book.

Friday

The lunchtime lecture at UCL will see neuroscientist Helen Moore uncovering how we can use light more effectively in our day-to-day lives and explaining what her work on zebrafish has to do with our own body clocks. 1:10-1:55; bring your lunch!

The Weekend

To summarise all the topics Ken Hollings and Quentin Cooper plan to cover in an hour of “Brain Wars” at the Wellcome Colllection would be impossible. A whistle stop tour of the history of neuroscience, from historical to current controversies including psychotherapy, mood stabilisers, the use of neuroscience in warfare and more. Sunday, 3-4pm; free.

Hampstead Observatory is still running its winter schedule of observing, open Friday and Saturday night 8-10pm for star gazing and Sunday 11-1pm for sun gazing. Free and no need to book, but all weather dependent, so check first.

You can follow the Nature Network London Google calendar of events in London at http://blogs.nature.com/london/2011/05/17/scientific-events-calendar. Updated daily.

————————————————————————–

As well as our regularly maintained calendar, you can find lots of other suggestions of science-y events in London. We have compiled a list of some other places to look: we will continue adding to this list, and please do, as always, send us additions for it:

Collections and calendars

Londonist recommendations: All things scientific, technical and geeky

Ian Visits: A calendar of all types of events in London, including science and engineering, with added editorial

Museums, societies etc:

Wellcome Collection: Regular events and exhibitions of a medical flavour at the Wellcome Collection on Euston Road

Royal Institution: Miscellaneous science and policy events

Royal Society: Science, policy and conferences

ZSL: Zoological Society of London; occasional events on conservation and zoology

Hunterian Museum: Part of the Royal College of Surgeons, with a treasure trove of specimens and surgical paraphenalia

University calendars (usually featuring dozens of events per week):

UCL

Imperial

LSE

 

Scientists and journalists need different things from science… or do they?

Scientists and journalists need different things from science. Discuss. That was the topic up for discussion at a special event at the Royal Institution on Tuesday evening, curated by the Guardian’s Alok Jha.

Chair Dr Alice Bell, science communicator, academic and lecturer at Imperial and UCL was joined by panelists Dr Chris Chambers from the University of Cardiff’s School of Psychology, Dr Ananyo Bhattacharya, Chief Online Editor of Nature, freelance science journalist and blogger, Ed Yong, and the Head of the UK’s Science Media Centre, Fiona Fox.  Framing the discussion online last week, Alok Jha had stated, “It is a truth universally acknowledged that the media, in general, could do a better job of reporting science”.

Alok proposed that there are good scientists, good journalists and a genuine desire to communicate science to the public but in many cases, good communication isn’t happening. Why not, and what can scientists and journalists do to improve the situation? The debate is not new – amongst many others, panelist Ananyo Bhattacharya last year wrote a series of three blog posts on the nature of science journalism and the distinction from science communication – and tonight’s event was specifically designed to get past theoretical, and often unproductive argument, and towards a set of practical actions which might be genuinely useful in changing things.

During the build up, Chris Chambers and colleagues set out a scientist’s view, while Ananyo Bhattacharya put forward the journalist’s point of view. Discussion was encouraged before and after the event using the Twitter hashtag #riscimedia and many other interested parties had their say, amongst them Matt Shipman, PIO at North Carolina State University, who has written a related seriesof three guest posts for Nature.com’s Soapbox Science blog on what scientists and journalists can expect from each other and the pitfalls and possibilities of being a non-expert writing on science.

With considerable debate having already occurred online, the discussion began at the RI: for those who missed it, we’ve created a Storify record of the event for you to follow along below. If you’d like to continue the conversation or add your feedback about the event, do leave a comment or get in touch.

Science Events in London: 12 – 18 March

Monday

The Institution of Engineering and Technology has a topical one tonight: a look at energy efficiency of the Olympic development. Panelists include representatives from Buro Happold and the ODA and will look at the strategies for delivering the energy strategy of the Olympic Park itself. 6-8:30; free but book.

Tuesday

The second in the series guest curated by Alok Jha at the Royal Institution is one especially for the science communicators amongst us: “Scientists and journalists need different things from science. Discuss”. With Alice Bell, Chris Chambers and Ananyo Bhattacharya for company, Alok will look at the gulf between what journalists do and what scientists think they should do. 7pm at the RI, £10, good availability at the moment, but I suggest booking soon.

Wednesday

Fracking has been in the press a good deal in recent weeks with last year’s earthquake in the UK largely blamed on it, and tonight the Dana Centre investigates the controversial new gas extraction technique with a showing of Josh Fox’s Oscar-nominated film Gasland. The film will be followed by a Q&A with experts from all sides of the debate. 6:30pm; free but book.

Thursday

Science Question Time is back and with a nicely controversial topic: nuclear power. The tagline asks “It’s 2012: can the UK finally have a mature debate on Nuclear Policy?” and those attempting to do just that tonight include the UK Atomic Energy Authority, Greenpeace and Nature’s Geoff Brumfiel who will be chairing the debate. 6:30pm at the Institute of Physics (near Great Portland Street); free but only 31 tickets remain so book now!

Friday

A History of Science lunchtime lecture at the Royal Society today on Florence Nightingale, looking particularly at her dislike of being painted. Natasha McEnroe, Director of the Florence Nightingale Museum, will look at her life through images to see what can be discerned about her life and final illness. Doors 12:30 for 1pm, free, no booking needed.

The Weekend

Hampstead Observatory is still running its winter schedule of observing, open Friday and Saturday night 8-10pm for star gazing and Sunday 11-1pm for sun gazing. Free and no need to book, but all weather dependent, so check first.

You can follow the Nature Network London Google calendar of events in London at http://blogs.nature.com/london/2011/05/17/scientific-events-calendar. Updated daily.

————————————————————————–

As well as our regularly maintained calendar, you can find lots of other suggestions of science-y events in London. We have compiled a list of some other places to look: we will continue adding to this list, and please do, as always, send us additions for it:

Collections and calendars

Londonist recommendations: All things scientific, technical and geeky

Ian Visits: A calendar of all types of events in London, including science and engineering, with added editorial

Museums, societies etc:

Wellcome Collection: Regular events and exhibitions of a medical flavour at the Wellcome Collection on Euston Road

Royal Institution: Miscellaneous science and policy events

Royal Society: Science, policy and conferences

ZSL: Zoological Society of London; occasional events on conservation and zoology

Hunterian Museum: Part of the Royal College of Surgeons, with a treasure trove of specimens and surgical paraphenalia

University calendars (usually featuring dozens of events per week):

UCL

Imperial

LSE

 

National Science and Engineering Week 2012

Today is the first day of National Science and Engineering Week 2012, an annual event organised by the British Science Association. Last year 1.7m people attended an event and over £1m was generated in press coverage, so it is a major undertaking and this year looks set to be no different with hundreds of events going on all over the country as well as affiliated science festivals. Perhaps surprisingly, London is not one of the six cities with a science festival this week, most likely because of the London Science Festival held in the autumn, but with over a hundred events listed in the region, that doesn’t mean there will be nothing for Londoners to do!

The set-up of the official events calendar is a little difficult to navigate, and when you look more closely at it, you realise the vast majority of the events are actually not specially put on for NSEW, but are short events that happen every week, for example at the Natural History Museum which have merely been collated into one place, or events at London schools, many of which are surely invitation only.

However, when you dig down, there are some gems to be found, and, as always, you can follow the Nature London calendar for the best of the week’s listings. A couple of early highlights:

Scientists and journalists need different things from science. Discuss. A special event at the Royal Institution curated by the Guardian’s Alok Jha. Nature London will be attending and blogging about it, but you can get involved too, by attending on Tuesday 13th at 7pm or by joining the discussion on Twitter with the hashtag #riscimedia

Science Question Time: The Nuclear Debate. It’s 2012: can the UK finally have a mature debate on nuclear policy? That’s what Geoff Brumfiel and his panel of guests including representatives from the UK Atomic Energy Authority and Greenpeace want to know. Hosted by the Institute of Physics, 6:30pm on Thursday 15th.

If leaving the house isn’t your thing for next week, you can still be involved in the other side of National Science and Engineering Week: the competition! Each NESW has a theme which this year is “Our World in Motion” and organisers are running a video competition for the best video on that topic. There are different categories, including school children and adults, but all have the same rules: you have 30s of video or animation to explain a scientific idea on that theme. There are some suggestions on the website as well as some videos already uploaded to YouTube, so if you fancy yourself as the next Patrick Moore – get filming!

 

Science Events in London: 5 – 12 March

Monday

A little out of London, but worth a trip for anyone with the afternoon off: the science of the paranormal with Professor Richard Wiseman at the University of Hertfordshire, Hatfield. Do you believe in mind reading, telepathy or ghosts? Professor Wiseman will show footage of paranormal events and discuss the science behind it. 4-6pm; free but booking essential.

Tuesday

A lunchtime lecture at UCL today touches on one of the most ongoing debates in science: the issue of patents. Not specifically science themed, but bound to be relevant: this 45 minute lecture will be given by The Rt. Hon. Professor Sir Robin Jacob , UCL Laws. 1:10 – 1:55pm in UCL’s Darwin Lecture Theatre, or streamed online.

Wednesday

A new series curated by Alok Jha starts tonight at the Royal Institution with “Consciousness: The Hard Problem”. Will consciousness ever be explained by neuroscientists? And what’s the latest thinking on it? Find out tonight, 7 – 8:30, £10 at the Royal Institution.

Another one from UCL tonight with a title as interesting as the topic: Mice People: Cultures of Science. Dr Gail Davies (UCL Geography) and former geneticist Dr Steve Cross (Head of Public Engagement, UCL) explore the world inhabited by animal researchers. 630 – 7:30: free, no need to book.

Thursday

Did you know that in the entire history of the prizes, Dorothy Hodgkin is the only British female recipient of a Nobel Prize for science? The Dana Centre looks tonight at initiatives to celebrate female scientists, with the MRC Clinical Sciences Centre explaining why they are creating publications and heirloom awards for women. 7 -9pm; free but book.

The Weekend

12th of March 2012 (Sunday) would have been Douglas Adams’ 60th birthday and to celebrate, his friends and family have put together a one off evening of science and comedy at the Hammersmith Apollo. Famous names from Robin Ince to Terry Jones, Jon Culshaw to Stephen Fry will be appearing, covering his whole range of interests. 5pm on Sunday at the Hammersmith Apollo; tickets £33.75 – book now.

Hampstead Observatory is still running its winter schedule of observing, open Friday and Saturday night 8-10pm for star gazing and Sunday 11-1pm for sun gazing. Free and no need to book, but all weather dependent, so check first.

You can follow the Nature Network London Google calendar of events in London at http://blogs.nature.com/london/2011/05/17/scientific-events-calendar. Updated daily.

————————————————————————–

As well as our regularly maintained calendar, you can find lots of other suggestions of science-y events in London. We have compiled a list of some other places to look: we will continue adding to this list, and please do, as always, send us additions for it:

Collections and calendars

Londonist recommendations: All things scientific, technical and geeky

Ian Visits: A calendar of all types of events in London, including science and engineering, with added editorial

Museums, societies etc:

Wellcome Collection: Regular events and exhibitions of a medical flavour at the Wellcome Collection on Euston Road

Royal Institution: Miscellaneous science and policy events

Royal Society: Science, policy and conferences

ZSL: Zoological Society of London; occasional events on conservation and zoology

Hunterian Museum: Part of the Royal College of Surgeons, with a treasure trove of specimens and surgical paraphenalia

University calendars (usually featuring dozens of events per week):

UCL

Imperial

LSE