Commenting on scientific articles (PLoS edition)

Commenting on scientific articles (PLoS edition)

I’ve been taking a look at the comments left on PLoS ONE from inception until August ‘08 (data courtesy ’http://www.scienceblogs.com/clock/2008/08/postpublication_peerreview_in.php’>Bora). Last week’s crowdsourcing paid off and all of the categorization work gone done really quickly – thank you if you participated! Pedro Beltrao and Lindsay Morgan were the random reward winners and will be receiving some magnificent Nature branded marketing crapola shortly.  Read more

Crowdsourcing comment categorization, pt 2

Crowdsourcing comment categorization, pt 2

As a reminder, if you haven’t already please do check out ploscomments.appspot.com and categorize some comments. Thanks to Grace we’ve gathered an impressive collection of swag for the one or two lucky contributors selected at random once the experiment is finished (and we remove bogus annotations). Check it: a USB laser foutain pen from Materials, It’s in my Nature.com tshirts, Darwin anniversary Post-its and pens… all for clicking on some buttons. http://ploscomments.appspot.com  … Read more

Comment threads on PLoS One

Comment threads on PLoS One

Deepak and Cameron both have interesting posts up that analyse the comments, notes and ratings left at PLoS One since inception. Making this data available was a cool thing for PLoS to do as they’re one of the few publishers / journals taking a serious stab at implementing commenting properly (Highwire’s BMJ and BioMedCentral being others. And us, of course, shortly ). Bora sent us the data too. I got caught up in other stuff and didn’t have time to analyze the dataset by the agreed date, but now I’m thinking that was actually a good thing as there’s some  … Read more

Wikiwikiwah

Wikiwikiwah

We’re launching a new wiki experiment this afternoon, driven by staff at Nature Reviews Genetics. The September ‘08 issue of NRG includes a new paper from ’http://www.nodalpoint.org/2007/08/06/scifoo_day_3_genome_voyeurism_with_lincoln_stein’>bioinformatics hero Lincoln Stein, describing the “cyberinfrastructure” of databases, protocols and services that is becoming more and more necessary for life science research as large scale datasets become common. We wanted the supplemental information for the paper (which lists different web services, databases, tools and initiatives) to be like a public database so that readers had the ability to add new information, revise out of date descriptions and remove broken links, so with Lincoln’s  … Read more