Comments

  1. Maya Mar said:

    Actually I was in Sweden for a post-doc and let’s say that I didn’t feel like Sweden was welcoming foreign scientists. First of all, there is clearly a lack of apartments or places for rent in Sweden. I guess they don’t want to build new housing units to stop foreigners from relocating there, being them very useful for their society or less useful. Then I visited a lot of libraries looking for some books or CD or anything with Swedish lessons, and I found none! Again, it seems like rejection of foreigners, at least for the working ones who have no time to go to classes few hours a day in a school. Yes, openly Swedish say they agree with foreigners to relocate in their country, but in fact all the actions there are against it. Or maybe they just want low-qualified workers to do the dirty tasks Swedish don’t want to do, like cleaning the streets. So I did my short post-doc stay in Sweden, paid by an European grant, and I left immediately after it since I clearly did not feel invited to stay there more and contribute to their society and scientific development.

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  2. Sri Ramulu ELLURU said:

    I agree with Maya Mar completely. Unless you have good connections you can never get funding on merit. Even the statistics show that Karolinska Institute gets majority of funds as though there is no other place for research. I am tired of looking for grant money as they have some reason to reject it.
    I suggest only those foreign researchers who are not planning to apply grants or to stay long term to apply to Sweden. Just read the forums in http://www.thelocal.se about the problems faced by foreigners to get housing, jobs or medical care. Thankfully, my colleagues helped me to solve the problems with paper work.