The Great Pacific Garbage Patch, beer supplies and more: the most popular science stories of 2018

Twenty-two of 2018’s papers in the Altmetric Top 100 were published in Nature Research journals: Nature, Nature Communications, Nature Plants, Nature Biotechnology, Nature Climate Change, Nature Human Behaviour, npj Science of Learning and Scientific Reports.

Launched today, the annual Altmetric Top 100 showcases the research published this year that has caught the public eye through international online attention. By tracking what people are saying about scholarly articles in the news, blogs, on social media networks, Wikipedia and many other sources, Altmetric calculates an Attention Score for each paper.

In this blog, the team in the Nature Research Press Office has picked some of their favourite studies, summarised their findings, and linked to coverage they received in the wider media. The full list is available at https://www.altmetric.com/top100/2018.

For articles from our subscription journals, we’ve included Springer Nature SharedIt links, which means anyone can read them. SharedIt, our free content-sharing initiative, was launched in October 2016.

#7 Scientific Reports — Evidence that the Great Pacific Garbage Patch is rapidly accumulating plastic

More than 79,000 tonnes of ocean plastic are floating inside The Great Pacific Garbage Patch, a figure up to 16 times higher than previously estimated, reported a study published in Scientific Reports earlier this year.

The study proved popular with the press generating over 1,400 news stories. Outlets that covered the research included NPRBBC News, National Geographic, The Hindu and Spiegel.

#9 Nature — Global warming transforms coral reef assemblages

Credit: ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef StudiesStudies/ Gergely Torda

A paper in Nature reported that corals on the Great Barrier Reef experienced a catastrophic die-off following the extended marine heatwave of 2016, transforming the ecological functioning of almost one-third of the 3,863 reefs that comprise the world’s largest reef system. The paper generated over 1,000 news stories, including articles in The New York Times, NPR, The Financial Times and Le Monde.

#19 Nature Plants — Beer supply threatened by future weather extremes

 

Beer’s main ingredient, barley, will have substantially diminished yields as severe droughts and heat extremes become more frequent owing to climate change, reported a paper published in Nature Plants in October. Beer will become scarcer and more expensive to varying degrees depending on national economic status and culture. In Ireland, for example, beer prices could increase by between 43% and 338% by 2099 under the most severe climate scenario.

The Guardian, the Associated Press, Reuters, NPR, and BuzzFeed were among those to report on the findings.

#50 Nature — The genome of the offspring of a Neanderthal mother and a Denisovan father

Credit: Bence Viola, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology)

A study in Nature reported the genome sequence of an ancient hominin bone fragment from Denisova Cave, Russia. The results suggested that the adolescent individual had a Neanderthal mother and a Denisovan father and provided direct evidence of interbreeding between Neanderthals and Denisovans. Coverage in nearly 2,000 news outlets, including 35 target outlets and nearly 250 web stories in China. The story was covered by BBC News, El País, Science, People’s Daily and National Geographic.

#69 Nature Communications — Embryos and embryonic stem cells from the white rhinoceros

Assisted reproductive technologies have been used to create hybrid embryos of the endangered northern white rhinoceros and a closely related subspecies, according to a Nature Communications study in July. In vitro fertilization has been used before in large mammals such as horses, but this report was the first to successfully develop rhinoceros embryos to the blastocyst stage in cell culture — potentially ready for implantation. The findings raise the possibility of being able to preserve some of the genes of the northern white rhinoceros.

Media coverage of the findings included The New York Times, Nature, ABC Australia, The Financial Times and Die Zeit.

#83 Nature Human Behaviour — Evaluating the replicability of social science experiments in Nature and Science between 2010 and 2015

Attempts to replicate 21 experimental social science studies published in Nature and Science between 2010 and 2015 found that one of the four Nature papers and seven of the seventeen Science papers evaluated did not replicate under the primary high-powered replication method used. The study was published in Nature Human Behaviour in August. The original studies likely contained false positives and inflated effect sizes, the authors suggested.

Reporting on the study included articles in The Washington Post, Times Higher Education, The Atlantic and BuzzFeed.

Towards minimal reporting standards for life scientists

This guest blog comes from a group of journal editors and experts in reproducibility and transparent reporting, who are putting together a framework for minimal reporting standards in the life sciences.

Transparency in reporting benefits scientific communication on many levels. While specific needs and expectations vary across fields, the effective use of research findings relies on the availability of core information about research materials, data, and analysis. These are the underlying principles that led to the design of the TOP guidelines, which outline a framework that over 1,000  journals and publishers have elected to follow.

In September 2017, the second major TOP guidelines workshop hosted by the Center for Open Science led to a position paper suggesting a standardized approach for reporting, provisionally entitled the TOP Statement.

Based on discussions at that meeting and at the 2017 Peer Review Congress, in December 2017 we convened a working group of journal editors and experts to support this overall effort by developing a minimal set of reporting standards for research in the life sciences. This framework could both inform the TOP statement and serve in other contexts where better reporting can improve reproducibility.

In this “minimal standards” working group, we aim to draw from the collective experience of journals implementing a range of different approaches designed to enhance reporting and reproducibility (e.g. STAR Methods), existing life science checklists (e.g. the Nature Research reporting summary), and results of recent meta-research studying the efficacy of such interventions (e.g. Macleod et al. 2017; Han et al. 2017); to devise a set of minimal expectations that journals could agree to ask their authors to meet.

An advantage of aligning on minimal standards is consistency in policies and expectations across journals, which is beneficial for authors as they prepare papers for publication and for reviewers as they assess them. We also hope that other major stakeholders engaged in the research cycle, including institutional review bodies and funders, will see the value of agreeing on this type of reporting standard as a minimal expectation, as broad-based endorsement from an early stage in the research life cycle would provide important support for overall adoption and implementation.

The working group will provide three key deliverables:

  • A “minimal standards” framework setting out minimal expectations across four core areas of materials (including data and code), design, analysis and reporting (MDAR)
  • A “minimal standards” checklist intended to operationalize the framework by serving as an implementation tool to aid authors in complying with journal policies, and editors and reviewers in assessing reporting and compliance with policies
  • An “elaboration” document or user guide providing context for the “minimal standards” framework and checklist

While all three outputs are intended to provide tools to help journals, researchers and other stakeholders with adoption of the minimal standards framework, we do not intend to be prescriptive about the precise mechanism of implementation and we anticipate that in many cases they will be used as a yardstick within the context of an existing reporting system. Nevertheless, we hope these tools will provide a consolidated view to help raise reporting standards across the life sciences.

We anticipate completing draft versions of these tools by spring 2019.  We also hope to work with a wider group of journals, as well as funders, institutions, and researchers to gather feedback and seek consensus towards defining and applying these minimal standards.  As part of this feedback stage, we will conduct a “community pilot” involving interested journals to test application of the tools we provide within the context of their procedures and community. Editors or publishers who are interested in participating are encouraged to contact Veronique Kiermer and Sowmya Swaminathan for more information.

In the current working group, we have focused our efforts on life science papers because of extensive previous activity in this field in devising reporting standards for research and publication.  However, once the life science guidelines are in place we hope that we and others will be able to extend this effort to other areas of science and devise similar tools for other fields.  Ultimately, we believe that a shared understanding of expectations and clear information about experimental and analytical procedures have the potential to benefit many different areas of research as we all work towards greater transparency and the support that it provides for the progress of science.

We are posting this notification across multiple venues to maximize communication and outreach, to give as many people as possible an opportunity to influence our thinking.  We welcome comments and suggestions within the context of any of these posts or in other venues.  If you have additional questions about our work, would like informed of progress, or would like to volunteer to provide input, please contact Veronique Kiermer and Sowmya Swaminathan.

On behalf of the “minimal standards” working group:
Karen Chambers (Wiley)
Andy Collings (eLife)
Chris Graf (Wiley)
Veronique Kiermer (Public Library of Science; vkiermer@plos.org)
David Mellor (Center for Open Science)
Malcolm Macleod (University of Edinburgh)
Sowmya Swaminathan (Nature Research/Springer Nature; s.swaminathan@us.nature.com)
Deborah Sweet (Cell Press/Elsevier)
Valda Vinson (Science/AAAS)

Supporting early career researchers through travel grants

As part of our commitment to championing the cause of promising early career researchers, the Communications journals (Biology, Chemistry and Physics) introduce a new series of travel grants.

This guest blog comes from Joe Bennett, Publisher, Communications journals.

Today the Communications journals have introduced travel grants for early career researchers. Our hope is that by introducing these grants we can reach promising but underfunded researchers who need support the most. This is the first round of what we expect will become a recurring process, and is part of a longstanding commitment by the journals to champion the cause of early career researchers.

The grants

Three grants, each of €2500, will be made available. We have chosen this amount as it will allow support for a researcher, without access to other funding, to attend an international scientific meeting and present their work. We understand that early career researchers are best placed to choose where they would benefit the most from presenting their work, and so applicants are invited to tell us which meeting they require funding to attend. As the grants are designed to support researchers who are working within limited means, recipients will receive the grant funds in full immediately after the panel has made their choice.

We have chosen to introduce this first round of travel grants as we believe that our journals should do more than just publish great science, they should also play an active role within the  communities they serve. We also know that travel to scientific conferences can allow researchers to present their work, hear about the latest research and meet other scientists from around the world to discuss ideas and possible collaborations.

The grants are available across the breadth of the subject areas of biology, chemistry and physics. Although the grants match the subject areas covered by the journals Communications Biology, Communications Chemistry and Communications Physics there is no requirement for applicants to have published in, or to have reviewed for the journals previously. Likewise there is no obligation for the grant recipients to publish their work in the journals.

Supporting early career researchers is vital

We have written before about the challenges facing early career researchers, including the fierce competition for funding.They make a positive contribution to our journals as authors, reviewers and Editorial Board Members. Many of our own in-house editorial staff were also early career researchers before joining Nature Research. Early career researchers are a part of the fabric of our journals and we believe that their work should be supported and their achievements highlighted. This is why we are proud to introduce the first round of grants to strengthen our commitment to champion their work.

A fair assessment

We considered carefully how to make the assessment process as fair as possible and to be mindful of how our unconscious bias can influence decision making. We have designed our process to account for this and will consider each application on its own terms whilst guided by a shared set of principles. We have tried to ensure that our selection panels include members with a broad and diverse range of experiences and have considered factors including gender, geography and whether they were the first member of their family to join academia when deciding the composition of our panels. Active scientists drawn from the Editorial Board of each journal will join our in-house editors on the judging panels.

To be considered for a grant, applicants must first demonstrate that they have a need for funding support. We will then consider the promise of the research within the application when we choose the recipients. All applicants will be judged against the same criteria:

  • Has the applicant demonstrated that without the grant they would not have the necessary funding available to enable travel to the event?
  • Does the applicant plan to present research that the assessment panel feel has outstanding potential and should be seen by the wider community?
  • How does the applicant stand to benefit from travelling to and attending the meeting?
  • Has the applicant been working within a scientifically emerging country or in difficult circumstances?

We admire researchers who conduct research with limited resources, who have overcome systemic barriers or any number of other challenges in pursuit of their ambition to pursue great science. When assessing applicants we will not be selecting the grant recipients based on an exceptional track record, but rather looking for applicants with outstanding promise who have been working within difficult circumstances. Not only will the grants benefit the researchers in question, but empowering and including traditionally marginalised researchers benefits the wider community as we get to meet them, hear their ideas, and learn from their experiences.

Apply

The grants are now open for applications until 5th November 2018. To read more and apply please visit our website: www.nature.com/early-career-travel-grants

Nature Research journals improve accessibility of data availability statements

The Nature Research journals have taken further steps to promote transparency and reproducibility by making information on the availability of research data within our articles easier to access.      

This guest blog comes from Iain Hrynaszkiewicz, Head of Data Publishing, Open Research Group at Springer Nature, and Sowmya Swaminathan, Head of Editorial Policy and Research Integrity at Nature Research.

All research articles published in Nature Research titles now provide data availability statements as a distinct article section that is freely and universally accessible. This means that data availability statements are now equivalently accessible to abstracts, full reference lists, supplementary information, acknowledgements, and other key article information. See two examples from Nature here (pictured) and here.

Since 2016, we have required all primary research papers published in Nature Research journals to include a data availability statement. The aim of this policy was to make the conditions of access to the “minimal dataset” ― defined as the dataset necessary to interpret, validate and extend the findings ― transparent to all readers. Data availability statements have become a widely established mechanism for authors to consistently describe if and how research data supporting their publications are available.  Such statements are required by many other Springer Nature journals in addition to the Nature Research journals, including the BMC group of journals, as well as those of other publishers. They are also increasingly used by funding agencies, institutions and researchers, as a means to measure data-sharing practices and behaviours ― and for building better connections between data and literature. Some funding agencies, such as the UK’s Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council, also require that data access statements are provided for policy compliance.

We believe that enhancing discoverability of data availability statements, by providing them as a separate section, could also:

  • Increase accessibility and reuse of the data-supporting publications, by making it easier to find ― by humans and machines
  • Encourage citation and reuse of data, including of data that are not publicly available
  • Promote good practices and common standards in preparing data availability statements
  • Enable funding agencies, institutions and other stakeholders to better monitor data sharing and compliance with data sharing-policies
  • Enable more precise research of data-sharing behaviours and practices

Our change in the way we present data availability statements to readers underscores our commitment to facilitating data access and the importance of data as a crucial component underlying the integrity, re-use and extension of published research. Our guide to authors and our specific guidance on data availability and data citations have been updated to reflect these changes.

Peer Review Week 2018: Creating equal opportunities for peer reviewers through training

This guest blog comes from James Houghton, Associate Publishing Manager, Nature Masterclasses.

This year’s Peer Review Week ― a global event celebrating the essential of role peer in maintaining scientific quality ― kicked off on 10 September. Diversity and inclusion in peer review is this year’s theme. Peer review is an essential part of the scientific publishing process. It ensures a certain level of scientific rigour and accuracy in published work by giving authors critical feedback to improve their papers. It is an activity academics must find time for among all the other demands they juggle. The burden of peer review is carried unevenly with some researchers doing more than their fair share and others not being offered (or not taking) the chance to participate.

Although it is known that women are underrepresented in STEM fields, the proportion of women contributing as peer reviewers is smaller than their representation in science overall. Female researchers are also less likely to accept invitations to review than their male counterparts. Early career researchers, regardless of their gender, can also be subjected to seniority bias, reducing their opportunities to contribute to peer review. These biases threaten the supply of reviewers needed to cope with the ever-increasing volume of scientific output. In addition, by being unwilling (owing to a lack of confidence, for instance) or unable to peer review, researchers can miss out on a valuable experience that could help them improve their writing skills, provide insights into emerging research topics or the latest advances in a field, and raise their profile as a researcher.

The biases that lead to underrepresentation of certain groups in the peer review process are often unconscious. Therefore, one way to broaden participation is to encourage editors and authors to be mindful of underrepresented groups when considering their choices of referees or recommending peer reviewers to assess their papers. Another approach is to improve access to training.  Some researchers might have the chance to help their supervisors to produce peer-review reports early in their career, but this option might not be available to every researcher. Formal training on how to produce a useful referee report can improve researchers’ confidence to participate in the review process and the quality of their reports, and can help widen representation.  However, such training is rare, and when given the opportunity to review, researchers without training are more likely to return reports that do not meet editors’ expectations, which can decrease the likelihood of them being asked to review in the future.

Ludic Creatives

At Nature Masterclasses we have developed a freely available online course that provides an overview of the peer review process and offers practical tips for how to be a great reviewer through video interviews, informative posts and interactive exercises. In our course, Nature Research editors and renowned scientists explain the importance of peer review and share their insights and experience on what editors expect from a good peer review report. They also advise on how to review an article and how to write and structure an excellent report.  The course also covers the ethics of peer review and new variations and innovations to improve the process. We hope that this resource will help level the playing field and ensure equal opportunities for researchers to peer review, independent of their gender, seniority, access to resources and geographical location.

Better training for peer reviewers will improve researchers’ confidence in their ability to provide an informative assessment and empower them to say “yes” when invited to review. High-quality reviews from trained researchers also benefit the academic community as a whole, delivering better scrutiny of submitted papers, informing editors in their decision-making process and helping authors to improve their publications.

If you’re interested in finding out more about peer review, you can visit the Springer Nature peer reviewer resource page or the Peer Review Week 2018 events page.

Nature Research journals trial new tools to enhance code peer review and publication

Starting this month, three Nature journals—Nature Methods, Nature Biotechnology and Nature Machine Intelligence—will run a trial in partnership with Code Ocean to enable authors to share fully-functional and executable code accompanying their articles and to facilitate peer review of code by the reviewers.

 This guest blog comes from Erika Pastrana, Executive Editor for the Nature Research Journals and Sowmya Swaminathan, Head of Editorial Policy and Research Integrity at Nature Research.

Increasing the reproducibility of scientific findings is a goal that all of us in the research enterprise share.

One path towards achieving this is to encourage authors to provide all relevant data and code associated with a published article. This enables others to re-run the analyses, reproduce the results and re-use the code and data to build on the work, advancing science further.

Since 2014 the Nature journals have required authors of studies with custom code or algorithms that are central to the conclusions to provide a “Code Availability” statement indicating whether and how the code or algorithm can be accessed, including any restrictions to access. In 2016, we adopted a policy of mandatory “data availability statements” on all Nature journal papers. The guiding principle is that these statements must provide enough information for readers to be able to reproduce the results and access the code and data for use in their own research.

A number of Nature Research journals have, for years, also peer reviewed code when it is central to the paper to ensure it is vetted scientifically, and provided the code as part of the published paper, typically in the supplementary information or via a link to a folder on GitHub (see this Nature Methods editorial from 2014). Despite our long-running efforts to publish code that is peer reviewed and useful, our platforms have not always been best suited to this task.

We know peer reviewing code is cumbersome as it requires authors to compile the code in a format that is accessible for others to check, and reviewers to download the code and data, set up the computational environment in their own computer and install the many dependencies that are often required to make it all work. To facilitate this process, we recently developed new guidelines for authors and a checklist to help during code submisison—but there are now tools available that go beyond checklists and PDFs.

Code Ocean is a computational reproducibility platform that aims to make code more readily executable and discoverable. The platform, which is based on Docker, hosts the code and data in the necessary computational environment and allows users to re-run the analysis in the cloud and reproduce the results, bypassing the need to install the software.

The trial is optional for authors of papers undergoing code peer review at these selected journals. Reviewers will be offered as much runtime as they need to run the code and analyses (100 hours per month by default), and upon publication, the code and data will be assigned a digital object identifier (DOI) and cited in the article, enabling readers to  access it freely via a link. Code Ocean, through CLOCKSS, will guarantee the preservation of the code, data, results, metadata and computational environment.

By partnering with Code Ocean, we hope to further facilitate compliance with our policies and practices, and to provide benefits to authors, reviewers and readers by improving the peer review experience and facilitating sharing of code that is reproducible and useful. We hope this functionality will also enhance our papers by linking to a platform where the results, code and data can be more easily verified, reproduced and re-used.

We will be attentively listening to the response in our community, and will be surveying all the authors and reviewers that participate in the trial to learn from their experience.

Code Ocean web-based interface

International Women’s Day 2018 – supporting equity in the physical sciences

This guest blog comes from May Chiao, Chief Editor of Nature Astronomy.

In the 1990s when I was studying physics, women were scarce, and it’s difficult to say who complained more about that, the men or the women! Since then, the proportion of women researchers in science has reached 40% or more in the USA, Canada, Australia, Brazil and Western Europe. Notably, Brazil and Portugal are near parity. But most of the women work in the life sciences. In the physical sciences, female representation remains below a quarter.

At Nature Research, the diversity of our authors and referees, not to mention our own staff, is very important. Our physical science journals are striving to find ways improve. From selecting a variety of reviewers (concerning gender, experience, geographic location) to asking those reviewers to expand our pool of our referees, we are constantly trying to reach more people.

To celebrate International Women’s Day today, we offer a collection of articles that highlight gender inequity or promote inclusivity in the physical sciences. We hope they will provide food for thought. And for change.

These articles included in this blog are free to access for a limited time.

Quantitative evaluation of gender bias in astronomical publications from citation counts

Nature Astronomy 1, 0141 (2017); doi:10.1038/s41550-017-0141

Gender discrimination is very much an issue in academia generally and in astronomy specifically. Through machine learning techniques, astronomy papers authored by women are shown to have 10% systematically fewer citations than those authored by men.

Considering climate in studies of fertility and reproductive health in poor countries

Nature Climate Change 7, 479–485 (2017); doi:10.1038/nclimate3318

Factors related to fertility such as population size, composition and growth rate may influence a community’s ability to adapt to climate change, particularly in poor countries. This Perspective describes theories and analytic strategies that can link climate to reproductive health outcomes.

A research agenda for a people-centred approach to energy access in the urbanizing global south

Nature Energy 2, 776–779 (2017); doi:10.1038/s41560-017-0007-x

Urban households in the global south face unique energy access challenges. This Perspective outlines a research agenda based on understanding the needs of urban energy users to promote inclusive urban energy transitions.

Gender differences in recommendation letters for postdoctoral fellowships in geoscience

Nature Geoscience 9, 805–808 (2016); doi:10.1038/ngeo2819

Gender disparities in science are well documented. An analysis of 1,224 recommendation letters from 54 countries for geoscience postdoctoral fellowships reveals that women are half as likely to receive an excellent letter as men.

Rethink your gender attitudes

Nature Materials 13, 427 (2014); doi:10.1038/nmat3975

Unconscious biases are a roadblock for gender equality in science.

Obituary: Mildred S. Dresselhaus (1930–2017)

Nature Nanotechnology 12, 408 (2017); doi:10.1038/nnano.2017.90

Mildred (Millie) Dresselhaus, a pioneer and world leader in nanoscience, passed away on 20 February 2017.

Inequality or market demand?

Nature Photonics 5, 639 (2011); doi:10.1038/nphoton.2011.282

A recent salary survey conducted by SPIE indicates that optics professionals working in North America are likely to earn significantly more than those elsewhere.

Physics for a changing world

Nature Physics 6, 828–829 (2010); doi:10.1038/nphys1830

Fifty years ago, Abdus Salam envisaged a ‘world centre’ for theorists. Now the institute that he founded is adapting to a changing world and to changing ways of doing science.

In addition, Nature Astronomy has published a Focus issue on gender equity: https://www.nature.com/collections/wmzzzfjpyz

Our pick of graphene papers from 2017

Looking back, 2017 was a great year for advances in graphene research. Lightweight and flexible, yet durable, graphene consists of a single layer of carbon atoms arranged in a hexagonal lattice. The material has been used to better solar panel technology, to enhance medical devices, and for the overall benefit of chemical and industrial processes. Nature Research presents a curated collation of graphene papers from our journals’ research portfolio during 2017.

Nature CommunicationsPEGylated graphene oxide elicits strong immunological responses despite surface passivation

Altmetric Score: 172

In the case of cancer treatment, to target specific tumours in the body, researchers have developed techniques where drug molecules are attached directly to the surface of a graphene sheets. Combining the nanomaterial and the drug molecules, these “nanotherapies” could help clinicians treat tumours by transporting the drugs directly to the tumours, where they can be released onto the cancer cells to help fight the disease. The findings are reported in Nature Communications.

Nature Communicationsp-wave triggered superconductivity in single-layer graphene on an electron-doped oxide superconductor

Altmetric Score: 292

Researchers have found a way to trigger the innate, but previously hidden, ability of graphene to act as a superconductor – meaning that it can be made to carry an electrical current with zero resistance. The finding, reported in Nature Communications, further enhances the potential of graphene, which is already widely seen as a material that could revolutionise industries such as healthcare and electronics.

Nature NanotechnologyTunable sieving of ions using graphene oxide membranes

Altmetric Score: 1032

A study published in Nature Nanotechnology describes a graphene membrane that can desalinate seawater, potentially offering easy and accessible potable water globally. The filtration system works by precisely controlling the membrane’s pore size to sieve common salts out of salty water.

NatureRemote epitaxy through graphene enables two-dimensional material-based layer transfer

Altmetric Score: 152

A novel cost-effective method that uses graphene as a “copy machine” to transfer intricate crystalline patterns from an underlying semiconductor wafer to a top layer of identical material is reported in Nature. Researchers worked out carefully controlled procedures to place single sheets of graphene onto an expensive wafer, and then grew semiconducting material over the graphene layer. The findings indicate that graphene is thin enough to appear electrically invisible, allowing the top layer to see through the graphene to the underlying crystalline wafer, imprinting its patterns without being influenced by the graphene.

Nature PhotonicsBroadband image sensor array based on graphene–CMOS integration

Altmetric Score: 247

A paper published in Nature Photonics, describes a method that combines a graphene semi-conductor device with quantum dots to create an array of photodetectors, producing a high resolution image sensor. When used as a digital camera this device is able to sense UV, visible and infrared light at the same time. This is just one example of how this device might be used, others include in microelectronics, sensor arrays and low-power photonics.

Nature CommunicationsGraphene balls for lithium rechargeable batteries with fast charging and high volumetric energy densities

Altmetric score: 246

Researchers have developed a unique “graphene ball”, designed to increase battery capacity by 45 per cent, according to a paper published in Nature Communications. While current research initiatives have advanced the technology behind lithium-ion batteries, these developments must often sacrifice capacity over charging speed, and vice versa.

Nature NanotechnologyUltrahard carbon film from epitaxial two-layer graphene

Altmetric score: 220

A study published in Nature Nanotechnology describes a process for creating diamene: flexible, layered sheets of graphene that temporarily become harder than diamond and impenetrable upon impact. Researchers worked to theorize and test how two layers of graphene could be made to transform into a diamond-like material upon impact at room temperature. They also found the moment of conversion resulted in a sudden reduction of electric current, suggesting diamene could have interesting electronic and spintronic properties. The new findings will likely have applications in developing wear-resistant protective coatings and ultra-light bullet-proof films.

 Nature CommunicationsIntegrated arrays of air-dielectric graphene transistors as transparent active-matrix pressure sensors for wide pressure ranges

Altmetric Score: 151

Researchers have created a three-dimensional, tactile sensor that could detect wide pressure ranges from human body weight to a finger touch. Using highly-conductive and transparent graphene transistors with air-dielectric layers, the sensor can detect different types of touch-including swiping and tapping. Reported in Nature Communications, the apparatus is capable of generating an electrical signal based on the sensed touch actions while consuming far less electricity than conventional pressure sensors.

 

 

Scientific ReportsMulti-frequency sound production and mixing in graphene

Altmetric score: 160

A pioneering new technique that encourages graphene to “talk” could revolutionise the global audio and telecommunications industries, according to a study published in Scientific Reports. Researchers devised a method to use graphene to generate complex and controllable sound signals. In essence, it combines speaker, amplifier and graphic equaliser into a chip the size of a thumbnail.

 

Nature CommunicationsRoom temperature organic magnets derived from sp3 functionalized graphene

Altmetric Score: 540

By using graphene treated with other non-metallic elements, researchers have devised the first non-metallic magnet that retains its magnetic properties up to room temperature, reports a study published in Nature Communications. Such chemically modified magnetic graphene has a vast range of potential applications, particularly in the fields of biomedicine and electronics.

 

 

Chinese New Year | 2018: Year of the Dog

Happy Chinese New Year! 2018 is the Year of the Dog, so we’ve put together a list of our favourite canine-related research papers from recent years. Nature Research invites readers to learn about the effects of domestication in canines, similarities in the genome of ancient and modern dogs, through to how human cardiovascular systems have benefited from their companionship.

Scientific ReportsThe effects of domestication and ontogeny on cognition in dogs and wolves

A study published in Scientific Reports based on where dogs and wolves searched for food after receiving hints, finds our domesticated companions cannot make the connection between cause and effect, but wolves can. The results from this study involving 12 captive wolves, 14 dogs and 12 pet dogs suggest that domestication may have reduced the independent problem-solving abilities of dogs in specific situations.

http://go.nature.com/2Bw1RHo

 

Scientific ReportsBirth of clones of the world’s first cloned dog

In 2005, researchers reported the first dog to be cloned – an Afghan hound named ‘Snuppy’. Since then, hundreds of other dogs have been cloned, offering an opportunity to learn more about the potential benefits and possible drawbacks of cloning animals. A paper published in Scientific Reports describes the creation and clinical follow-up of 4 clones using adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells from Snuppy as donor cells.

 

 

Nature Communications – Ancient European dog genomes reveal continuity since the Early Neolithic

The genome of ancient European dogs is similar to that of modern dogs, reports a paper published in Nature Communications. The study also suggests Europe was the centre of modern dog evolution, harbouring the oldest uncontested Palaeolithic remains.

http://go.nature.com/2o9zWon

 

Scientific Reports – Dog ownership correlates with lower rates of mortality and cardiovascular disease

Dog ownership appears to be associated with lower risk of cardiovascular disease in single-person households and lower mortality in the general population, reports a paper published in Scientific Reports.

http://go.nature.com/2Eyiq8k

 

Nature Reviews Genetics – Demographic history, selection and functional diversity of the canine genome

Despite being a single species, dogs represent nearly 400 breeds with substantial genetic, morphological and behavioural diversity. Published in Nature Reviews Genetics, this Review discuss how genomics studies of dogs have enhanced our understanding of dog and human population history, the desired and unintended consequences of trait-based selective breeding, and potentially human-applicable insights into cancer, ageing, behaviour and neurological diseases.

http://go.nature.com/2o3h9vC

Scientific Reports – Human attention affects facial expressions in domestic dogs

An initial study published in Scientific Reports suggests dogs produce facial expressions communicatively and increase their frequency based on the attention they receive from another individual. The authors argue that their data points to a more flexible system combining both emotional and cognitive processes in dogs.

An initial study published in Scientific Reports suggests dogs produce facial expressions communicatively and increase their frequency based on the attention they receive from another individual. The authors argue that their data points to a more flexible system combining both emotional and cognitive processes in dogs.

Scientific Reports – Functional MRI in Awake Dogs Predicts Suitability for Assistance Work

Brain scans of canine candidates to assist people with disabilities may help predict which dogs will fail a service training program, according to a study published in Scientific Reports. Data from functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) of 43 dogs provided a modest, but significant, improvement in the ability to identify poor candidates. Despite calm exteriors, some of the dogs showed higher activity in the amygdala – an area of the brain associated with excitability and anxiety. These dogs were more likely to fail the training programme.

 

http://go.nature.com/2EGYHTd

 

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