The people you thought mattered in 2011

At the end of 2011 we published the Nature 10: ten people who mattered in science that year. We explained how we reached our choice, through discussion (and arguments). We also asked readers to tell us in a poll who they thought had a significant impact in science that year. Readers could vote for the people in the Nature 10 as well as ten others, some of whom had been nominated on Twitter. Seeing as we’re now well into 2012, it’s past time we reported the results.  Read more

Resurrecting extinct proteins shows how a machine evolves

By bringing long-dead proteins back to life, researchers have worked out the process by which evolution added a component to a cellular machine. The result, they say, is a challenge to proponents of intelligent design who maintain that complex biological systems can only have been created by a divine force.  Read more

UK announces major study of human development

UK announces major study of human development

Some 90,000 babies born in the UK will grow up to become some of the most scientifically scrutinised in the world. The UK government announced today that researchers will track the group in a new multi-million pound ‘birth cohort’ study with the aim of understanding how social, economic and biological factors during pregnancy and infancy eventually influence people’s health, development, occupation, education and well being.  Read more

World Science Festival: Scientists explore grey matters at The Moth

What do a Nobel prize-winning physicist, a stem cell scientist and a video game pioneer have in common? They were all onstage at New York University’s Webster Hall on Thursday night to talk about how science impacted their lives — in ways both humorous and poignant — at The Moth, New York’s quirky storytelling venue.  Read more

World Science Festival: Scientists explore grey matters at The Moth

What do a Nobel prize-winning physicist, a stem cell scientist and a video game pioneer have in common? They were all onstage at New York University’s Webster Hall on Thursday night to talk about how science impacted their lives — in ways both humorous and poignant — at The Moth, New York’s quirky storytelling venue.  Read more

World Science Festival: Gala of Science

World Science Festival: Gala of Science

There was something for everyone’s taste in the “cool cup of science” — as actor Alan Alda introduced it — that made up the opening gala for this year’s World Science Festival in New York. The evening included an impressive roster of artists, from Yo-Yo Ma to John Lithgow to Kelli O’Hara; and an equally impressive line-up of scientists, including Stephen Hawking, the physicist to whom the evening’s performances paid tribute.  Read more

World Science Festival: Gala of Science

World Science Festival: Gala of Science

There was something for everyone’s taste in the “cool cup of science” — as actor Alan Alda introduced it — that made up the opening gala for this year’s World Science Festival in New York. The evening included an impressive roster of artists, from Yo-Yo Ma to John Lithgow to Kelli O’Hara; and an equally impressive line-up of scientists, including Stephen Hawking, the physicist to whom the evening’s performances paid tribute.  Read more

AAAS 2010: Blogs, twitter, videos … oh my!

It would have been more appropriate to have my laptop open and to blog or twitter while at the talk on Communicating Science in the New Information Age. But alas, even if I had remembered my laptop at 8:30 in the morning, it would have been useless at the San Diego Convention Center; oddly enough, most of the rooms lack WiFi. So I stuck it out with the ways of the “old information age”: pen and paper.  Read more

AAAS 2010: Blogs, twitter, videos … oh my!

It would have been more appropriate to have my laptop open and to blog or twitter while at the talk on Communicating Science in the New Information Age. But alas, even if I had remembered my laptop at 8:30 in the morning, it would have been useless at the San Diego Convention Center; oddly enough, most of the rooms lack WiFi. So I stuck it out with the ways of the “old information age”: pen and paper.  Read more

AAAS 2010: 13 months of science and Obama

You have to hand it to Eric Lander: he gives a good talk. At last night’s plenary session, he admitted he would have been more comfortable talking about the human genome. But as one of three co-chairs of the President’s Council of Advisors on Science and Technology (PCAST) he was instead tasked with reflecting on science and technology in the Obama administration just over one year in, and he kept the full house rapt.  Read more